THE B2M VILLAGE


Houses

Electricity for homes and other necessary functions can be provided with steam engines. In additon to burning fuel, we can capture the energy from the exhaust of our internal combustion engines after all, 2/3s of the energy from a car's fuel goes right out the tail pipe! - and we can use the heat from the chemical reactions in the B2M condenser. The blades of the turbine can be made with oak and lubricated with tallow from our sheep

Equally important is the Negawatt a unit of energy that measures energy we never had to use. By using gravity, warm clothing, and well-designed buildings, we can reduce our energy needs to consume only what we produce.

Nature Stewardship

A big part of the stewardship of marginal land is to respect nature's intention for it. An oak tree drops thousands of acorns in its attempt to seed a new tree and only a fraction will happen to land where an adult oak would thrive. By transplanting a sprout to an ideal location, we've fulfilled nature's needs and we can responsibly feed the rest to the pigs, which converts the land's resources into food for the two-leggers.

Aquaponics

A space-efficient farming technique for raising fish and veggies in tandem. The fishes' waste becomes the plants' fertilizer as water is cycled through. Talapia, our fish of choice due to it's ability to convert feed nearly pound-for-pound to meat, require relatively warm water so the system's placement next to the B2M equipment is a great way to capture and use stray heat from the B2M process.

Gasifier

Energy is crucial to a thriving community. The B2M (Biomass to Methanol) process converts wood from responsible forest management to usable fuel that can power cars and tractors and provide monetary income. It is the keystone of the B2M village and is currently in the research phase You can help! Become a critical part of the solution by subscribing with a small monthly donation.

The first step of the B2M process is gasification- the conversion of wood chips to gas. The B2M village will make the technology easily maintainable with parts that can purchased at a typical hardware store and structure the community to capture the massive sensible heat that would be lost into the air.

Compressor

Energy is crucial to a thriving community. The B2M (Biomass to Methanol) process converts wood from responsible forest management to usable fuel that can power cars and tractors and provide monetary income. It is the keystone of the B2M village and is currently in the research phase You can help! Become a critical part of the solution by subscribing with a small monthly donation.

The second step is to compress the gas. An important part of making this process work on the village scale is to leave the monitoring to computer-managed programs freeing up the community's time to work on other things.

Condensor

Energy is crucial to a thriving community. The B2M (Biomass to Methanol) process converts wood from responsible forest management to usable fuel that can power cars and tractors and provide monetary income. It is the keystone of the B2M village and is currently in the research phase You can help! Become a critical part of the solution by subscribing with a small monthly donation.

The last step of the process is to condense the fuel. This chemical process puts off a great deal of heat, which can be captured to heat essential buildings and provide steam to power electricity generators.

Community

An incredibly important part of the B2M village system is culture. We have a tried and tested system of by-laws to help guide the decision-making and conflict-resolution portions of community interaction. We foster a culture of mutual support, including a gift economy that runs on labor and goods exchange.

Using every resource

Gardens grow food and weeds; the food goes to the kitchen, and the weeds go to the goats who convert them into milk for the kitchen and compost for the garden. Making a living on marginal land means using all of its resources and finding a multi-use place for everything it offers.

Plants on marginal lands

The B2M village is designed to work on marginal lands (since that is all that may be available to many communities). Our flagship village, Windward, rests in the mountains of Washington at 2,000 ft elevation, so the soil gets cold. Terraces help expose the soil to the sun and keep roots warm.

Hot tubs

It is infinitely easier to get along if everyone is clean and comfortable. Hot tubs also provide a place for recreation and community bonding. Though it may seem like a luxury, it's another way to scavenge energy from the sensible heat the Biomass to Methanol process puts out. It's position next to the B2m equipment makes harnessing the energy easier.

Laundry

An important part of a sustainable community is hygiene basics like clean clothes. We can achieve this energy-intensive task with scavenged energy from the Biomass to Methanol process, saving the community effort, money and emissions.

Bakery

As another energy-intensive building, the bakery is also positioned next to the B2M equipment to easily capture stray energy. A member of the community will be awarded stewardship of a community essential like baking, and will ask for or offer help from others as seasonal work fluctuates.

The B2M Village Project is an open source, community-based system of technologies and philosophies focused on building energy-independent, sustainable rural communities.

B2M Gasifier

The first step of the B2M process is gasification‒the conversion of wood chips to gas. The B2M village will make the technology easily maintainable with parts that can purchased at a typical hardware store and structure the community to capture the massive sensible heat that would be lost into the air.

Close
B2M Compressor

The second step is to compress the gas. An important part of making this process work on the village scale is to leave the monitoring to computer-managed programs freeing up the community's time to work on other things.

Close
B2M Condensor

The last step of the process is to condense the fuel. This chemical process puts off a great deal of heat, which can be captured to heat essential buildings and provide steam to power electricity generators.

Close
Capturing Heat

By arranging energy-intensive buildings around the B2M equipment, we are able to scavenge the heat incredible heat that is put off by the process and put it to use. Laundry, bathing, baking, and greenhouses are close by to capitalize on the energy. Next, houses are heated by piping hot water through the floor. The last stop is as tepid water to irrigate ground crops.

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Nature's Plan

A big part of the stewardship of marginal land is to respect nature's intention for it. An oak tree drops thousands of acorns in its attempt to seed a new tree and only a fraction will happen to land where an adult oak would thrive. By transplanting a sprout to an ideal location, we've fulfilled nature's needs and we can responsibly feed the rest to the pigs, which converts the land's resources into food for the two-leggers.

Close
Plants on Marginal Land

The B2M village is designed to work on marginal lands (since that is all that may be available to many communities). Our flagship village, Windward, rests in the mountains of Washington at 1,000 ft elevation, so the soil gets cold. Terraces help expose the soil to the sun and keep roots warm.

Close
Community and Social Bylaws

An incredibly important part of the B2M village system is culture. We have a tried and tested system of by-laws to help guide the decision-making and conflict-resolution portions of community interaction. We foster a culture of mutual support, including a gift economy that runs on labor and goods exchange.

Close
Aquaponics

A space-efficient farming technique for raising fish and veggies in tandem. The fishes' waste becomes the plants' fertilizer as water is cycled through. Talapia, our fish of choice due to it's ability to convert feed nearly pound-for-pound to meat, require relatively warm water so the system's placement next to the B2M equipment is a great way to capture and use stray heat from the B2M process.

Close
Electricity

Electricity for homes and other necessary functions can be provided with steam engines. In addition to burning fuel, we can capture the energy from the exhaust of our internal combustion engines after all, two thirds of the energy from a car's fuel goes right out the tail pipe! - and we can use the heat from the chemical reactions in the B2M condenser. The blades of the turbine can be made with oak and lubricated with tallow from our sheep

Equally important is the Negawatt a unit of energy that measures energy we never had to use. By using gravity, warm clothing, and well-designed buildings, we can reduce our energy needs to consume only what we produce.

Close
Using Every Resource

Routine plant maintenance produces pounds and pounds of weeds which are happily fed to the animals. Making a living on marginal land means using all of its resources and finding a multi-use place for everything it offers.

Close

Recent site updates

Recent site updates ▼

Dec 2015 ‒ Winter Update

July 2015 ‒ Summer Update

Dec 2014 ‒ Winter Update

B2M scalability timeline

B2M scalability timeline ▼

  • 1 gal
  • 10 gal
  • 100 gal
  • 1000 gal
  • Proof of concept
  • Fuel all cars & tractors
  • Fuel all needs & extra to sell
  • Start in-forest production

Community News

Community News ▼

Permaculture Spring Break

March 21-24, 2016

4-days putting permaculture theory into practice

The Village Helix

May 27-30, 2016

Windward's annual open-house event

What is B2M and what's it got to do with sustainability?

Rural communities are collapsing because of the rising cost of energy products; they're selling off their non-renewable resources in order to pay their bills, and sending their children to the city to work. Rural forests, overgrown and choking with "fuel," are a lighting strike away from catastrophic fires. Without the care of people who love and protect it, the land is being stripped of life.

All communities run on energy, and any community that hopes to endure needs to work out ways to meet its energy needs in a sustainable manner. We believe that the most sustainable route is to use self-replicating solar collectors (cleverly disguised as trees) to convert sunshine, rain and carbon dioxide into wood, a stable form of energy which can then be converted into replacements for gasoline, diesel, propane and natural gas. Every dollar's worth of fuel produced in-country is a dollar that remains in-country supporting local community. By enabling rural people to become the start of the supply chain‒instead of being trapped at it's end‒the conversion of woody biomass into fuel lays the foundation for local sustainability.

Why is a smaller, recurring donation better for engineering research?

Money is a powerful tool, but a dreadful master, something which is especially true when it comes to building relationships between people, and between people and the land they care for. It's tempting to think of how much progress could be made if B2M got a large government grant or won the support of some wealthy venture capitalist, but big money always comes with a price. Too many projects like B2M have crashed under the weight of big money.

In life, the end is often determined in the beginning. B2M is a community centered energy system; it's not being developed to make anyone rich. It's goal is to enable people who love the land to be able to live on it, care for it and ensure that the bond between people and land survives the economic cycles that are destroying community.

Small, recurring donations allow the work to go forward in a manner that mimics the development of organic networks by not asking too much of any one person. Even when the research is complete, B2M won't function without community involvement--this isn't "plug and play" technology. By building in community involvement from the start, we ensure that as B2M unfolds, it will create an alternative to continuing to depend on multinational energy corporations.

What's the timeline for the B2M research?

We've already worked out how to turn our forest waste into a reliable gasification feedstock. We've also worked out how to transform our forest waste to create woodgas, a functional replacement for natural gas, and how to use that gas for heating and electrical generation.

During 2016, we'll continue work on constructing the equipment needed to safely compress, store and analyse woodgas. Different reactions will be used to produce different energy products, and each reaction has unique input requirements for temperature, pressure and chemical ratios, so the current work is focused on developing a flexible process that can be adapted to local needs and circumstances.

The rate at which the work goes forward depends on the financial support provided by supporters like you,( B2M's True Fans), and on the operational support of the Hungry Samurai who bring their scientific and engineer training to bear on the work.

Where can I learn more about:

B2M's goals

B2M's conceptual overview

B2M's biomass source

B2M's community context

B2M's historical context

The local focus of the work

The chemistry of biomass conversion

Unusual terms used in B2M